(Review) The Violinist of Auschwitz by Ellie Midwood

Publisher and Publication Date: Bookouture. November 18, 2020.
Genre: Historical fiction. World War II. Holocaust.
Pages: 356.
Format: Kindle edition e-book.
Source: NetGalley. I received a complimentary e-book copy, but was not required to write a positive review.
Audience: Readers of Holocaust stories.
Rating: Excellent.

Amazon link
At this time the e-book is $3.99

Ellie Midwood’s Goodreads page.

To read more information about Alma Rosé:
Music and the Holocaust
World History

Summary:
The prologue starts the story creating a fear of what might happen.

The year is 1943.
Alma Rosé is a well-known virtuoso violinist. She’s played in Holland, Austria, Germany, and other countries on the continent of Europe. She has family members who are well-known musicians and composers. They are Jewish.

Alma and her father make it safely to England, but she returns to Holland to continue performing. She is arrested and sent to Drancy, France. From there she is sent to Auschwitz.

After arriving at Auschwitz she is sent to the experimental block. She plays the violin in a concert. She is recognized as the famous violinist Alma Rosé. She is moved to the female orchestra block. Alma becomes the conductor of the female orchestra. Her position makes is possible to save other females in the camp if they are able to play a musical instrument.

Alma meets Miklos a pianist and composer. It is an instant connection and attraction.

My Thoughts:
It’s interesting the story starts with a foreshadowing of the ending. Since I had not read the true story of Alma Rosé, I read the story fresh and without knowing the events in her life.

The Violinist of Auschwitz is an emotional story. The name and setting of the story is immediate at causing an anguish in my spirit.

The story is a reminder of the harsh and stressful daily survival for the prisoners. But, the story is a reminder of the bond and unity of the prisoners. Their quiet defiance against the Nazis and their devotion to help one another.

The writing style and tone expresses the serious and somber story. Yet, there is beauty in certain scenes. For example, a stolen and tender moment between a couple. There is also sarcasm. Alma is a person who has a strong personality. It is difficult for her to remain quiet and stoic. Her feelings are often expressed as sarcasm. However, she has moments that are emotionally overwhelming and she is stunned.

The Violinist of Auschwitz has external conflicts, but there is internal conflicts with the prisoners who are confronted with gut-wrenching type decisions.

Themes in the story: courage, death, bravery, loyalty, love, passion, kindness, compassion, and perseverance.

I’m thankful Ellie Midwood wrote this important story. It is a strong testament of Alma Rosé.

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